In Harm's Way: Living or Dead?

Which cast members of 1965 film by Otto Preminger In Harm's Way have died?

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1965 film by Otto Preminger

In Harm's Way

Release date 1965
Released53 years (approx) ago
Duration 165 minutes
Correction?
In Harm's Way
In Harm's Way
Publicity photo of Barbara Eden and Larry Hagman from I Dream of Jeannie "Fastest Gun in the East" 1966 episode. When Tony wishes for the days of the Old West, Jeannie grants his wish by making him sheriff of a small Western town.

About In Harm's Way

In Harm's Way is a 1965 American epic Panavision war film produced and directed by Otto Preminger and starring John Wayne, Kirk Douglas, Patricia Neal, Tom Tryon, Paula Prentiss, Stanley Holloway, Burgess Meredith, Brandon deWilde, Jill Haworth, Dana Andrews, and Henry Fonda. It was one of the last black-and-white World War II epics, and the last black-and-white John Wayne film. It has had a mixed response over the years as a war film that had a simple story, a charge also leveled against Preminger's other later movies. The screenplay was written by Wendell Mayes, based on the 1962 novel Harm's Way, by James Bassett. The film recounts the lives of several US naval officers and their wives or lovers while based in Hawaii as the US involvement in World War II begins. The title of the film comes from a quote from an American Revolutionary naval hero: I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast, for I intend to go in harm's way. The film presents a relatively unromantic and realistic picture of the American Navy and its officers from the night of December 6, 1941 through the first year of the US involvement in World War II, complete with bureaucratic infighting among the brass and sometimes disreputable private acts by individuals. Its sprawling narrative is typical of Preminger's works in which he examined institutions and the people who run them, such as the American Congress and the Presidency in Advise and Consent, the Catholic Church in The Cardinal and the British Intelligence Service in The Human Factor.