Is Hoagy Carmichael Living or Dead?

Has American composer, pianist, singer, actor and bandleader Hoagy Carmichael died? Or is he still alive?

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American composer, pianist, singer, actor and bandleader

Hoagy Carmichael is ...

Dead
Born 22 Nov 1899 in Bloomington
Died 27 Dec 1981 in Rancho Mirage
Age82 years, 1 month
Correction?
Hoagy Carmichael
Hoagy Carmichael
Front and northern side of the Hoagy Carmichael House, located at 214 N. Dunn Street in Bloomington, Indiana, United States. Built in 1900, it is part of the locally-designated North Indiana Avenue Historic District.

About Hoagy Carmichael

Hoagland Howard "Hoagy" Carmichael (November 22, 1899 – December 27, 1981) was an American composer, pianist, singer, actor, and bandleader. American composer and author, Alec Wilder, described Carmichael as the "most talented, inventive, sophisticated and jazz-oriented of all the great craftsmen" of pop songs in the first half of the twentieth century. Carmichael is one of the most successful of the Tin Pan Alley songwriters of the 1930s, and was among the first singer-songwriters in the age of mass media to utilize new communication technologies, such as television and the use of electronic microphones and sound recordings. Carmichael composed several hundred songs, including fifty that achieved hit record status. He is best known for composing the music for "Stardust", "Georgia on My Mind" (lyrics by Stuart Gorrell), "The Nearness of You", and "Heart and Soul" (in collaboration with lyricist Frank Loesser), four of the most-recorded American songs of all time. He also collaborated with lyricist Johnny Mercer on "Lazybones" and "Skylark." Carmichael's "Ole Buttermilk Sky" was an Academy Award-nominee in 1946; "In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening," with lyrics by Mercer, won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1951. Carmichael also appeared as a character actor and musical performer in fourteen motion pictures, hosted three musical-variety radio programs, performed on television, and wrote two autobiographies.

He is also known as Howard Hoagland Carmichael.

Death

Carmichael died of heart failure at the Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage, California, on December 27, 1981, at the age of eighty-two. His remains are buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Bloomington, Indiana.

In 1986 Carmichael's family donated his archives, piano, and memorabilia to his alma mater, Indiana University, which established a Hoagy Carmichael Collection in its Archives of Traditional Music and the Hoagy Carmichael Room to permanently display selections from the collection.

Carmichael is considered to be among the most successful of the Tin Pan Alley songwriters of the 1930s, and was among the first singer-songwriters in the age of mass media to exploit new communication technologies, such as television and the use of electronic microphones and sound recordings. American composer and author Alec Wilder described Carmichael as the "most talented, inventive, sophisticated and jazz-oriented of all the great craftsmen" of pop songs in the first half of the twentieth century. Carmichael was an industry trailblazer, who recorded varied interpretations of his own songs and provided material for many other musicians to interpret. His creative work includes several hundred compositions, some of them enduring classics, as well as numerous sound recordings and appearances on radio and television and in motion pictures.

Albums

Hoagy Carmichael has been involved with: