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Sheldon Silver

American politician

Sheldon Silver is ...

Dead

Born 13 February 1944 in Manhattan
Died 24 January 2022 in Ayer
Age 77 years, 11 months

Sex or gender male
Country of citizenship United States of America
Occupation politician
Position held member of the New York State Assembly, member of the New York State Assembly, member of the New York State Assembly, member of the New York State Assembly and Speaker of the New York State Assembly
Educated at Brooklyn Law School, Yeshiva University and Rabbi Jacob Joseph School

About Sheldon Silver

Sheldon Silver born on 13 February 1944 in Manhattan. He is a citizen of United States of America. Sheldon Silver was educated at Brooklyn Law School, Yeshiva University and Rabbi Jacob Joseph School. He died on 24 January 2022 in Ayer at age 77 years, 11 months.

He was an American politician.

Sheldon Silver has worked as a politician.

Sheldon Silver has held the position of member of the New York State Assembly and Speaker of the New York State Assembly.

About Death

As Speaker, Silver was instrumental in the reinstatement of the death penalty in New York State in 1995. New York's death penalty law was eventually ruled unconstitutional by the New York Court of Appeals in People v. LaValle (2004). The law provided that juries in capital cases would be instructed that if they deadlocked between sentencing a defendant to life imprisonment without parole and sentencing a defendant to death, the judge would sentence the defendant to life imprisonment with parole eligibility after 20 to 25 years. The Court found this provision unconstitutional, reasoning that this instruction would make execution seem preferable to juries because they would wish to avoid a defendant's potential future release on parole. Although no executions were carried out under the 1995 law, New York's crime rate dropped significantly in the decade since the law was passed. Silver let the law expire without much debate.