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Winston Churchill

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Winston Churchill is ...

Dead

Born 30 November 1874 in Blenheim Palace
Died 24 January 1965 in Hyde Park Gate
Age 90 years, 2 months
Cause cerebrovascular disease

Sex or gender male
Country of citizenship United Kingdom
Birth name Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill
Manner of death natural causes
Father Lord Randolph Churchill
Mother Lady Randolph Churchill
Sibling John Strange Spencer-Churchill
Spouse Clementine Churchill, Baroness Spencer-Churchill
Child Randolph Churchill, Diana Churchill, Sarah Churchill, Mary Soames and Marigold Frances Churchill
Occupation politician, journalist, painter, historian, autobiographer, screenwriter and biographer
Nominated for Nobel Prize in Literature, Nobel Prize in Literature, Nobel Prize in Literature, Nobel Prize in Literature, Nobel Prize in Literature, Nobel Prize in Literature, Nobel Prize in Literature, Nobel Peace Prize and Nobel Peace Prize
Notable work A History of the English-Speaking Peoples and The Second World War
Position held Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Secretary of State for Defence, Secretary of State for Defence, Chancellor of the Exchequer, Secretary of State for the Home Department, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, Minister of Munitions, Leader of the Opposition, Leader of the Conservative Party, First Lord of the Admiralty, First Lord of the Admiralty, Secretary of State for the Colonies, Secretary of State for Air, Secretary of State for War, Member of Parliament in the United Kingdom, Member of Parliament in the United Kingdom, Member of Parliament in the United Kingdom, Member of Parliament in the United Kingdom, Member of Parliament in the United Kingdom, Member of Parliament in the United Kingdom, Member of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom and member of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe
Awards Nobel Prize in Literature, Companion of the Liberation, Fellow of the Royal Society, Grand Cross of the Order of the Oak Crown, Honorary citizen of the United States, grand cross of the Order of the White Lion, Charlemagne Prize, Knight Grand Cross with Collar of the Order of St. Olav‎, Freedom Award, Knight Grand Cross in the Order of the Netherlands Lion, Grand Cordon of the Order of Leopold, Congressional Gold Medal, Distinguished Service Medal, Queen's Sudan Medal, Queen's South Africa Medal, Ordre de la Libération, Médaille militaire and Albert Medal
Member of Royal Society and American Academy of Arts and Sciences

About Winston Churchill

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British statesman, army officer, and writer. He served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As a Member of Parliament (MP), he represented five constituencies over the course of his career. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory during the Second World War. He led the Conservative Party for fifteen years from 1940 to 1955. Churchill was born into an aristocratic family, the son of an English politician and American socialite. Joining the British Army, he saw action in British India, the Anglo–Sudan War, and the Second Boer War, gaining fame as a war correspondent and writing books about his campaigns. Moving into politics, before the First World War, he served as President of the Board of Trade, Home Secretary, and First Lord of the Admiralty as part of Asquith's Liberal government. During the war, Churchill departed from government following the disastrous Gallipoli Campaign. He briefly resumed active army service on the Western Front as a battalion commander in the Royal Scots Fusiliers. He returned to government under Lloyd George as Minister of Munitions, Secretary of State for War, Secretary of State for Air, then Secretary of State for the Colonies. After two years out of Parliament, he served as Chancellor of the Exchequer in Baldwin's Conservative government of 1924–1929, controversially returning the pound sterling in 1925 to the gold standard at its pre-war parity, a move widely seen as creating deflationary pressure on the UK economy. Out of office during the 1930s, Churchill took the lead in warning about Nazi Germany and in campaigning for rearmament. At the outbreak of the Second World War, he was again appointed First Lord of the Admiralty. Following Neville Chamberlain's resignation in May 1940, Churchill became Prime Minister. His speeches and radio broadcasts helped inspire British resistance, especially during the difficult days of 1940–41 when the British Commonwealth and Empire stood almost alone in its active opposition to Adolf Hitler. He led Britain as Prime Minister until after the German surrender in 1945. After the Conservative Party's defeat in the 1945 general election, he became Leader of the Opposition to the Labour Government. He publicly warned of an "Iron Curtain" of Soviet influence in Europe and promoted European unity. He was re-elected Prime Minister in the 1951 election. His second term was preoccupied by foreign affairs, including the Malayan Emergency, Mau Mau Uprising, Korean War, and a UK-backed Iranian coup. Domestically his government laid great emphasis on house-building. Churchill suffered a serious stroke in 1953 and retired as Prime Minister in 1955, although he remained an MP until 1964. Upon his death, he was given a state funeral. Named the Greatest Briton of all time in a 2002 poll, Churchill is among the most influential people in British history, consistently ranking well in opinion polls of Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom. As a writer, he won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953 for his overall, lifetime body of work. His highly complex legacy continues to stimulate intense debate amongst writers and historians.