Get Smart: Living or Dead?

Which cast members of American comedy television series Get Smart have died?

Living or Dead? Celebrities, films, tv shows, birthdays, deaths ... your one-stop shop to satisfy your morbid curiosity.


American comedy television series

Get Smart

Started 18 Sep 1965
Seasons 5
Episodes 138
Correction?
Get Smart
Get Smart
Photo of Barbara Feldon as Agent 99 and actor Joseph Ruskin from the television comedy series Get Smart!. There are no copyright marks on the item, which can be seen at the link. United States Copyright Office page 2 "Visually Perceptible Copies The notice for visually perceptible copies should contain all three elements described below. They should appear together or in close proximity on the copies. 1 The symbol © (letter C in a circle); the word “Copyright”; or the abbreviation “Copr.” 2 The year of first publication. If the work is a derivative work or a compilation incorporating previously published material, the year date of first publication of the derivative work or compilation is sufficient. Examples of derivative works are translations or dramatizations; an example of a compilation is an anthology. The year may be omitted when a pictorial, graphic, or sculptural work, with accompanying textual matter, if any, is reproduced in or on greeting cards, postcards, stationery, jewelry, dolls, toys, or useful articles. 3 The name of the copyright owner, an abbreviation by which the name can be recognized, or a generally known alternative designation of owner.1 Example © 2007 Jane Doe."

About Get Smart

Get Smart is an American comedy television series that parodies the secret agent genre that was popular in the United States in the late 1960s. The program was created by Mel Brooks and Buck Henry, and had its television premiere on NBC on September 18, 1965. The show stars Don Adams (who also worked as a director on the series) as agent Maxwell "Max" Smart, or Agent 86, Barbara Feldon as Agent 99, and Edward Platt as Thaddeus, the Chief. Henry said that they created the show at the request of Daniel Melnick to capitalize on "the two biggest things in the entertainment world today": James Bond and Inspector Clouseau. Brooks said: "It's an insane combination of James Bond and Mel Brooks comedy."The show generated a number of popular catchphrases during its run, including "Would you believe...", "Good thinking, 99", "Missed it by that much!", "Sorry about that, Chief", "The old (such-and-such) trick", "And loving it", and "I asked you not to tell me that". The show was followed by the films The Nude Bomb (a 1980 theatrical film made without the involvement of Brooks and Henry) and Get Smart, Again! (a 1989 made-for-TV sequel to the series), as well as a 1995 revival series, and a 2008 film remake. In 2010, TV Guide ranked Get Smart's opening title sequence at number two on its list of TV's top 10 credits sequences as selected by readers.After switching networks in 1969, to CBS, the show ended its five-season run on May 15, 1970, with a production roster at both networks of 138 episodes. The Museum of Broadcast Communications finds the show notable for "broadening the parameters for the presentation of comedy on television."